WRITER'S TIPS

ALRIGHT and ALL RIGHT - which is correct?

Although ‘alright’ is commonly used it is not generally regarded as good usage. It may become fully acceptable some time in the future but the only acceptable form at present is ‘all right’.

ALTOGETHER and ALL TOGETHER - What is the difference?

Altogether means wholly, entirely, completely.
Eg: I‘m not altogether satisfied with your excuse.

All together means all at the same time or the same place.
Eg: Please put the books all together on the shelf.

Writers' Tip provided by Jo Hamlet, Readers' World Editor


 

Words are usually used for writing numbers in short stories.
There is, however, a certain point where figures should be used instead of words.
Authorities have different views on when this should be.
However it is common practise to use figures for numbers greater than ten.
Whatever you do - be consistent.
NB Never begin a sentence with numbers, use words eg
Three children went to the party (correct)
3 children went to the party (wrong)

Writers' Tip provided by Jo Hamlet, Readers' World Editor


 

 

If you base a character on a real person be extra careful.
If the prose damages a person's reputation you could be up for big dollars.
Make sure you disguise their identity well. Change their ethnicity, gender, where they live and, of course, their names. But I only write fiction you might say - you can still be sued. And it's true you might add but can you substantiate it - can you afford to?

Writers' Tip provided by Jo Hamlet, Readers' World Editor


 

Imagination is probably one of the most important assets a writer can have.
But beware, imagination can be a powerful weapon - it is so easy to lose control.
If a writer has no knowledge of his subject his imagination can soar to such a great height that it loses its sense of direction. If this happens, stories can become not only unbelievable but also totally absurd.

Writers' Tip provided by Jo Hamlet, Readers' World Editor


 

Descriptions can be long and boring.
To prevent this we use something called 'Show Don't Tell',
also known as painting pictures without words.

To do this you need to use the five senses: Hearing, sight, touch, taste and smell.
When you write a short story you don't have to use all of these but try and use as many as possible.
Example:
The flowers were beautiful - okay. What does the reader know about these flowers? Apart from being beautiful - zilch! There is no picture for the reader. Why are they beautiful?
Sight: Perhaps they were organge and resembled a sunset on a warm summer evening.
Touch: Perhaps the leaves were prickly or soft like the skin of a new-born baby.
Smell: Does the smell remind the writer of something? Perhaps a heavy oriental smell like the perfume his ex used.
If you say: Anne is sick, what's wrong with her? Does she have the flu? Is she mentally ill? Try painting a picture of Anne using the five senses. It will be far more interesting for the reader and they will be able to picture poor old Anne.

Writers' Tip provided by Jo Hamlet, Readers' World Editor


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PLEASE NOTE: DUE TO THE OVERWHELMING NUMBER OF LITERARY SUBMISSIONS WE RECEIVE, WE HAVE FOUND IT NECESSARY TO UPDATE THE GUIDELINES WHERE INDICATED

Your initial submission (PLEASE RESTRICT TO ONE ONLY):

  • Typed manuscripts, A4 double spacing, wide margins and pages numbered. 
  • Manuscripts must be edited ready for publishing with correct spelling, grammar and punctuation
  • Please include a completed copy of the ‘Manuscript Submission SlipÂ’ (see below).  Please also send a SSAE for our reply to you.  An e-mail address, if available, should also be included.
We are looking for works from 500 to 5000 words, although shorter works are preferred to allow the inclusion of more authors in each issue. Any story longer than 5000 words will not be read.  

Any genre will be accepted.  Characters and plot should be plausible within the setting of the story. There should be audience appeal, entertainment and accurate research. Articles and poetry are also acceptable.

We do not accept pornographic works, socially unacceptable violence, or offensive language, although adult reading will be accepted.

As well as content in your story/article/poem, we will now only be accepting submissions if there is no editing required (eg. grammar, punctuation, spelling) as the standard of Readers' World magazine must continue to improve. Effective immediately, if you do not correct your own work and wish for our editor to edit it, a fee of $10 will be charged for stories and articles, $5 for poetry.

We cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, material sent to us. 

If accepted, we will require your work on an IBM-compatible disc [in Microsoft Word or text format; Times New Roman font, size 10; single spacing; justified; 5mm indent at the beginning of each paragraph (except for the first!)]. 

If you cannot supply your work on disc in this exact format, we can provide this for a fee of $5 per 500 words (minimum charge is $5) and we will send the disc to you once your work has been published. (Include $2 for return of disc to you at the time of submitting your work, if you require this service).  

IF WE DO NOT RECEIVE YOUR WORK IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT, WE CANNOT PUBLISH IT - PLEASE BE AWARE OF THIS.
 

Payment:

Payment will be made within 60 days of publication of the work in Readers' World magazine as per the following rates:

Short Stories .........$15.00
Poems...................$ 5.00

 

We REALLY WOULD like to be able to pay our authors more but, at the present time, as a family-owned business we are not in a position to be able to do this.  

Please, if you know of anyone who would enjoy a good read, ask them to subscribe - this will ensure that payments increase in the future!

Send to:

    NEW WORKS
    READERS' WORLD
    PO BOX 301
    JOONDALUP WA 6919
Anthology books:

Short stories or poems for possible inclusion in one of our anthology books will be assessed and, if of an acceptable standard, may be included in one of our compilations (Maximum 1500 words).

Please Note: There is no payment for work published in a book.

The books are for sale to writers and friends at $22.00 each,  which includes postage within Australia.  The books will have a write-up in Readers' World magazine and also be included on our web page. 

Please fill in your credit card details when you submit your work, with the number of books you would require. This will not be deducted until your work is confirmed as publishable.
Please indicate the genre of your work, as we may produce theme anthologies if there is enough interest.

Partner Publishing: Indian Ocean Books

If you have the desire to have your longer story/novel published, then we can assist you with that too. 
We will carry out the whole production process, you just have to send us the content. 
We will advertise your book in our magazine, as well as on our web page, so you will be connected to the world! 
We will even co-ordinate a book launch for you, if you so require.

Send to:

    INDIAN OCEAN BOOKS
    c/- READERS' WORLD
    PO BOX 301
    JOONDALUP WA 6919
Contact June for a quote on:

Telephone: (08) 9300 8247
Mobile:      0403 154 749
Facsimile: (08) 9300 8247
E-Mail: iob@readersworld.com.au

 

CLICK HERE FOR MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION SLIP